What Do You Value?

Life is hard. We go to school, higher education and then hopefully find a job to support us until we die. Such a mundane existence seems pointless, and for many people who don’t have a vocation they are immediately drawn to may find life that much harder. Some people know from an early age they want to be doctors, lawyers or even engineers or something like that. Most people, myself included, bounce from ideal profession to ideal profession – usually attracted to flashier jobs and those which ultimately lead to fame and fortune. Growing up, I wanted to be a rapper, football player and just about everything in between. It’s as you grow up that you realise you may not be as special as you’re led to believe. You may have been the best football player in your school at your age group level, but that’s not how life works and age isn’t really a defining factor. There’s also the fact that every school also has a “best player”, which creates an immense numbers of “special players”. And when everybody is special, nobody is. That cold, harsh reality dawns on your quickly and you soon learn that maybe you aren’t really the BEST.

Life, as I’ve said is hard, and not really knowing what your “calling” in life is makes it that much harder. We place an immense value on how much money we make and how successful we’re perceived to be that the pressure of finding a high income job is that much more. Most people aren’t looking to find a career in a field they love and are passionate about. Granted, some do love their work and do what they love, but it isn’t the majority of people. We all have hobbies and things we love doing, but more often than not we put those passions on the back burner to commit ourselves to working the soul draining jobs we subject ourselves too. That’s just the way life is though. We don’t always get to do the things we love and enjoy. In an ideal world, we could all do the things we love and be paid for it. Due to reality being what it is, all we can do is never let the flame die. Never let work and life drain you to the point at which you don’t make time to spend even a minuscule portion of your day doing what you love.

Growing up in today’s society, it’s easy to let the vast expectations weigh you down and plague your mind. I’m sure I speak for the masses when I say that these pressures are one of the many demons that visit me. These expectations combined with my indecision about my future are definitely not something that I enjoy. I wanted to be a psychologist or a writer. But I thought about the financial aspect behind both those professions and quickly realized that business would most likely guarantee financial stability. I sacrificed and am sacrificing my dreams for the prospect of possibly being stable. Doesn’t seem like a worthy trade off but it’s how it is. I’m not writing this to garner sympathy, nor do I desire people to tell me “Oh no man. Drop the business and do what you love!”

No, I’m writing this for those that are in a similar position to me. Those that don’t really know what exactly they want to be doing. Those that feel overwhelmed by everything. Those that are drowning in the world. This is just to let all those people know, you’re not alone in the way you feel.

There’s nothing wrong with not knowing everything and having step by step plans. Just take everything one day at a time and keep your head above water. I know I said earlier everyone is special which means no one is special, but at the same time, own what you do and do it to the best of your abilities. You’re in competition with no one. The only person you need to be better than, is the person you were yesterday.

We as a society need to stop comparing and contrasting who is more successful by the amount of money we make or the job we hold. We should just be happy for people who find success in their chosen ventures, and focus on improving ourselves and being happy with our own situations. We need to create our own happiness and focus on develop ourselves, rather than focusing on how much money we can make. I’m guilty of this superficial mindset, but I’m slowly working on changing the way I think and what I perceive as important. And I encourage you to do the same. Stop focusing on the next person and allowing other people’s success to determine how much you value yourself. You’re more than your job. You’re more than your bank balance. Work a job you hate, but don’t give up on your dreams. My father always told me spend even just 10 minutes a day perfecting your hobby and you can make money off it. Take that principle and just do what you love for 10 minutes a day, not in the hope of making money, but to feel some joy in a world devoid of money-less success and enjoyment.

In conclusion, I pose this question to you. If you took money out of the question, what would you chose to do? I’m willing to bet it’s something you actually love. If you’re one of those people who is working a job they absolutely love, then that’s great – keep at it and don’t lose your vigour. If you’re working a job you hate or you have no idea what job you even want to do, don’t lose the ray of sunshine in an otherwise cloudy world by not spending time doing what you love. You might not make money off it, but it will bring you happiness. And can you put a value on that?